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Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 2011 Week 01 Hansard (Tuesday, 15 February 2011) . . Page.. 50 ..


MS GALLAGHER: Do I—sorry? Can you repeat it?

Mr Hanson: Are you unaware of the significant disquiet amongst many doctors in the ACT about your performance?

MS GALLAGHER: I am aware that about five doctors at the moment disagree with my being in this job, and I can name them all. I imagine they are the ones that are in your ear all the time. And we have hundreds of doctors in this place.

ACT public sector—Hawke review

MR HARGREAVES: My question is to the Chief Minister. Chief Minister, earlier today you publicly released, in full, the Hawke review of the structural capacity of the ACT public sector.

Members interjecting—

MR SPEAKER: Order! Mr Hargreaves, you have the floor.

MR HARGREAVES: Thank you very much; when the children are quiet, Mr Speaker. I will keep saying it. Chief Minister, earlier today you publicly released, in full, the Hawke review of the structural capacity of the ACT public sector. What was the rationale for commissioning this piece of work?

MR STANHOPE: I thank Mr Hargreaves for the question. Indeed, it is a very important issue and a very important report. Roughly six months ago, as members know, I commissioned Dr Allan Hawke to review the structure, capacity and effectiveness of the ACT public sector. I did that because it is important, as we approach our second century as a city, and as we officially come of age as a self-governing jurisdiction, that we ensure that our systems of administration are fit for purpose. We have just celebrated our 21st anniversary of self-government. Yet the ACT public service, by and large, as presently configured, was lifted from the commonwealth public service at the point of self-government. Its agency structures and in large part its culture came as part of the package.

But much, as we all know, has changed. In many respects the work we do now as a government was unimaginable on the first day of self-government. Our population is now a third larger, the territory’s budget has more than quadrupled, technology has transformed how government connects with, communicates with and delivers services to people. We have matured as a community. Indeed, we are at the point where we are starting to actively and legitimately question whether the systems of government, governance and administration imposed upon us at self-government are the best ones for our circumstances.

There is a growing mood for a mature and thorough review of the self-government act, with a desire to better define our relationship with the National Capital Authority and to work better together. There is a desire to have our structures more open to input from the community. There is a realisation that the big challenges for our community in the decades ahead are ones that will need to be tackled in a whole-of-government fashion, not by a single line agency, most notably issues such as climate change,


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