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Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 2006 Week 5 Hansard (11 May) . . Page.. 1715..


Is it the case that regardless of any formal legal training or qualification upon being appointed Attorney-General the Attorney-General is, by dint of being the First Law Officer of the Territory (a) automatically admitted as a Legal Practitioner of the ACT Supreme Court, (b) automatically admitted to the Bar of the ACT Supreme Court or (c) otherwise is given an entitlement that would allow them to practice as a legal practitioner in the ACT.

Mr Corbell

: The answer to the member's question is as follows:

a) No. The Attorney General is not automatically admitted as a Legal Practitioner of the ACT Supreme Court.

b) No. The Attorney General is not automatically admitted to the Bar of the ACT Supreme Court.

c) The Attorney General is not a legal practitioner under the Legal Practitioners Act 1970. To the extent that the Attorney General is given functions under the Law Officers Act 1992, he has rights to perform functions equivalent to a legal practitioner.

These functions include being the ACT's chief legal representative, the principal legal adviser to the ACT, and to institute and conduct litigation on behalf of the ACT. Section 196 of the Legislation Act 2001, provides that "a provision of a law that gives a function to an entity also gives the entity the powers necessary and convenient to exercise the function."

The Attorney General acts only in the name of the Attorney General and not personally. In all such matters, I act through the ACT Government Solicitor.

Public service—positions

(Question No 1090)

Dr Foskey asked the Chief Minister, upon notice, on 4 May 2006:

(1) What is the number of permanent (a) appointments, (b) resignations and (c) redundancies that have been made to the ACT Public Service over the past (i) year, (ii) six months and (iii) three months;

(2) At what level were each of those permanent (a) appointments, (b) resignations and (c) redundancies as listed in part (1);

(3) From which departments and agencies were those permanent (a) appointments made or positions lost.

Mr Stanhope

: The answer to the member's question is as follows:

(1) On the best information available, for agencies using the Chris 21 Human Resource system, the table below details the number of permanent (a) appointments, (b) resignations and (c) redundancies that have been made to the ACT Public Service over the past (i) year, (ii) six months and (iii) three months:


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