Next page . . . . Previous page . . . . Speeches . . . . Contents . . . . Sittings . . . . Search

Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 2003 Week 5 Hansard (6 May) . . Page.. 1557..


MR SPEAKER: I am sorry, Mr Cornwell, the motion has been passed. If you want to return to that issue, you will have to work out some other device.

Mr Cornwell: Mr Speaker, my understanding of the motion passed was that it was that the Assembly takes note of the papers.

MR SPEAKER: You are correct, Mr Cornwell. What happened is that Mr Pratt sought leave to move a motion that the Assembly takes note of the papers and leave was granted. Mr Pratt moved accordingly. The Assembly then considered the motion and voted in favour of that motion. To revisit it, you will have to work out another way of doing so and it gets more complex by the day.

Mr Cornwell: I take your advice, Mr Speaker.

MR SPEAKER: I think you ought to talk to the Clerk.

Mr Cornwell: I will. Thank you.

Financial Management Amendment Bill 2003

Debate resumed from 3 April 2003, on motion by Mr Quinlan:

That this bill be agreed to in principle.

Debate (on motion by Mr Smyth ) adjourned to the next sitting.

Construction Practitioners Legislation Amendment Bill 2003

Debate resumed from 1 April 2003, on motion by Mr Corbell:

That this bill be agreed to in principle.

MR SMYTH (Leader of the Opposition) (11.06): Mr Speaker, the opposition will be supporting this legislation. We are aware that the building and construction industry is a major driver of the local economy. The rebuilding from the tragic fires has added stress to the system and the removal from the register of two certifiers, for various reasons, has created some difficulties.

Unlike other jurisdictions-New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland especially-which also have private building certification, there has been no capacity in the ACT to enable the government to provide certification services. This bill addresses that shortcoming.

On our side of the political fence, we are very wary of the government intruding into what is essentially the sphere of the private sector. However, in this case we are satisfied that the provisions in the bill provide for what is essentially a safety net or, to put it another way, a certifier of last resort.


Next page . . . . Previous page. . . . Speeches . . . . Contents . . . . Sittings . . . . Search