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Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 1995 Week 03 Hansard (Wednesday, 31 May 1995) . . Page.. 646 ..


MS FOLLETT (Leader of the Opposition): Mr Speaker, I seek leave to present a petition which does not conform with standing orders in that it does not address the Assembly.

Leave granted.

MS FOLLETT: Mr Speaker, I present an out-of-order petition from 33 residents who express the wish to remain in their present accommodation at the Watson Health Services Hostel.

REHABILITATION SERVICES – REVIEW

Ministerial Statement

MRS CARNELL (Chief Minister and Minister for Health and Community Care): I ask for leave of the Assembly to make a ministerial statement on the review into rehabilitation services in the ACT.

Leave granted.

MRS CARNELL: Mr Speaker, this Government is committed to the development and improvement of health services in the ACT. During a four-month period in 1994 a review of rehabilitation services in the ACT was conducted. This review, similar to that of the homecall program, was funded by the Medicare incentives program. In other words, it was federally funded. It provides an overview of rehabilitation services in the ACT prior to mid-1994. It is clear that in the past the development of rehabilitation services in the ACT has been fragmented.

The review examined rehabilitation services both in the ACT and in the south-east region of New South Wales in terms of availability, gaps and inadequacies in access, appropriateness, and linkages and coordination. The services were considered under the groupings of musculo-skeletal, prosthetic and orthotics, and neurological and acquired brain injury. The review did not cover psychiatric or drug and alcohol rehabilitation. The review adopted a collaborative approach, using a steering committee of government, non-government, union and consumer representatives.

During the review, consumers and service providers were consulted and a range of issues were identified, including inconsistencies in services which were not meeting the community's expectations or needs. The review found that a number of themes emerged about the current range of rehabilitation services. For example, services to meet the accommodation needs of the young brain injured and the transitional living requirements for adults were inadequate. Improved outcomes were reported for people who are involved in a rehabilitation program which includes a transitional living service. A transitional living environment provides, in a homelike environment, the opportunity for people to gain skills and confidence in activities that are part of their daily routine.


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