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Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 1995 Week 01 Hansard (Tuesday, 2 May 1995) . . Page.. 102 ..


I would encourage members not to feel that we are taking away a prayer. Rather, we are allowing the inclusion of people who are not included. To my way of thinking, Mr Speaker, that would be a more Christian approach, one that is inclusive rather than exclusive. Let me re-emphasise, Mr Speaker, that, in order to allow appropriate community discourse and discussion, the debate on the prayer will not occur until early June. The debate on the standing orders which are largely uncontroversial, or have already been canvassed in the community, will take place in accordance with this motion during Assembly business next Thursday.

Debate (on motion by Mr Hird) adjourned.

ADJOURNMENT

Motion (by Mr Humphries) proposed:

That the Assembly do now adjourn.

May Day

MR BERRY (9.04): Mr Speaker, although it is 2 May, I would like to talk about May Day.

Mr Moore: Surprise, surprise! Every year.

Mr Humphries: Always out of date.

Mr Moore: Are you recycling the same speech?

MR BERRY: No, no. There seems to be a little bit of agitation on the other side every time you mention something around which workers organise. May Day has been an important day for the working community throughout the world for many a year. It is also a day which is celebrated one way or another in Australia. There was a celebration here in the ACT in relation to it. I was able to hear the trade union choir in full voice. The choir was developed by the local Trades and Labour Council and is a worthwhile endeavour.

I would like to talk about a few other significant events as well, and some of my early contacts with May Day. Some members may recall that the Marcos regime was coming to an end in 1986 and Corazon Aquino was about to take the reins in the Philippines. At about that time my wife and I were on a trade union delegation in the Philippines and we attended a May Day celebration in Manila. About 500,000 people attended that rally because they were welcoming a change. There had been a struggle throughout the Philippines about the oppressive regime there and there was a great anticipation in the community about change. The community had developed this understanding.


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