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Legislative Assembly for the ACT: 2018 Week 7 Hansard (1 August) . . Page.. 2535 ..


Ms Le Couteur has just looked at the nominal side. She has just looked at a figure that goes up and does so by several hundred thousand dollars each year, not millions and millions. It reflects population increase and general economic activity increase. In this year's budget you will see that the difference, which I think is about $34 million, rising to $35 million and then $36 million and then increasing, includes the provision for the point of consumption wagering tax. There is a new tax. That is why the revenue line is increasing.

The other factor that will contribute to the overall increase will of course be the level of utilisation of poker machines. Not all machines in the ACT are 100 per cent utilised at this point in time, and even with a reduction from 5,000 to 4,000 it is unlikely that all poker machines will be 100 per cent utilised throughout the available span of hours when those machines are operating.

Mr Parton: But it actually doesn't achieve anything.

MR BARR: Undoubtedly a reduction in the number of poker machines does have an impact. The only way to completely eliminate that impact, which is a position I am sure Mr Parton supports, given his very strong views on this matter, would be to abolish poker machines altogether. But Mr Parton believes that gambling addiction is like chocolate addiction. That is the level of public debate from the opposition on this matter. (Time expired.)

Canberra Hospital—safety

MR RATTENBURY: Mrs Dunne asked me about ligature points. I now have some more specific details to provide her.

Mrs Dunne: Order! Can I hear this, please?

MADAM SPEAKER: You are requesting no interruptions, Mrs Dunne? Not that I can make comment from the chair—but please, all members.

MR RATTENBURY: Phase 1 of the work commenced on 23 April 2018 with the removal of ensuite doors, ensuite door barricade flaps and door closers that represent the highest ligature risk. As of June 2018, all the works included in the phase 1 scope of work had been completed. Phase 2 work includes the remaining ligature minimisation works throughout these two facilities, excluding the bedroom doors. Those phase 2 works are currently underway.

As I touched on in my earlier answer—this is just more detail—phase 3 involves the bedroom door replacement, which includes the electrostatic viewing panels. These are panels that avoid people having to disturb clients in their rooms. It is a feature of the new UCH. And there is hardwired access control for both the doors and the viewing panels, which also means that door handles can be removed. These works are scheduled to commence after completion of phase 2 in August 2018.


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